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Curriculum Guide

Message From the Superintendent

Administrators, counselors, teachers and all other staff of Rankin County School District are dedicated to providing students a well-rounded curriculum that is designed to produce successful learners, while supporting personal, social, and emotional development.

This handbook is provided as a guide for students and parents to use collaboratively as a plan is established for the journey through school that will lead, ultimately, to the goal of securing a productive career. Think about academic and career goals as courses are selected. The district provides a variety of course options for students to access so they can become informed decision makers regarding their own path toward success in the global economy. 

Planning is of the utmost importance. It is recommended that parents and students talk at length about anticipated career options and design a course of study that will support the goals set. Personnel are available at the local school to assist the family in making these important educational decisions.

Our Mission

*B*ring *E*veryone’s *S*trengths *T*ogether!  We will all intentionally focus on empowering our students to reach their maximum potential by embracing opportunities and challenges while cultivating a tradition of distinction in education.

Equal Educational Opportunities

The Rankin County School District grants equal educational opportunities to all qualified persons regardless of race, creed, color, sex, national origin, marital status, religion, or disability.

It is the intent and desire of the Rankin County Board of Education that equal educational opportunities be provided in any and all educational programs and activities.

All inquiries regarding Rankin County School District’s nondiscrimination policies, requests for copies of grievance procedures, and filing of grievances should be submitted to the following person:

Dr. Sue Townsend, Superintendent
Rankin County School District
1220 Apple Park Place
Brandon, MS 39042
townsend@rcsd.ms

LEGAL REFERENCE:  MS Code 37-15-35; 1972 Educational Amendments, Title IX; 1964 Civil Rights Act, Title VI; 1973 Rehabilitation Act, Section 503 & 504; 45 CFR Part 84 and Part 86; Brown vs. Board of Education, 347 U. S. 483 (1954); Mississippi Public School Accountability Standards.  
JB* 7-11-01

Rankin County School District Board of Education

David Dyess
Kym Jamison
Grumpy Farmer
Dr. Ruth Burgess
Mrs.Debbie Tolleson
Ann Sturdivant
Dr. Sue Townsend, Superintendent
Mr. Fred Harrell, Board Attorney

College and Career Readiness

Graduation Requirements
Additional Requirements
Summer School and Extended School Year


Graduation Requirements 

RCSD Policy IHF - Graduation Requirements

Students in Rankin County School District shall graduate from this district utilizing Mississippi Department of Education (MDE) graduation options listed in the Mississippi Public School Accountability Standards (MPSAS) and by meeting all other requirements as defined by the Mississippi Department of Education. The superintendent or designee shall establish procedures to support this policy. Please refer to the current Rankin County School District Student Handbook for specific information regarding graduation. 

Any person who has withdrawn from high school before graduation may be granted a diploma from the Mississippi public high school that the person last attended if the person has:

  • Completed all requisite graduation course work requirements and has achieved the equivalent requirements a passing score on an assessment reasonably comparable to the respective assessments that would qualify the person for high school graduation as such assessments existed at the time that the student would have graduated;
  • Made a request to the public high school district that the person last attended in Mississippi that includes relevant transcripts of coursework completed.

The Mississippi Public School Accountability Standards for this policy are standards 14 and 21. 

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS

Each student graduating from a secondary school in the district shall have earned at least two of the last four Carnegie units at the school granting the diploma. No more than four units earned in summer school programs may be counted toward graduation requirements, with a limit of earning one unit per summer session.

For students entering ninth grade in 2018-19 school year and thereafter:

  • Students must take a math or science course during the senior year. (MDE recommendation)
  • Students seeking early graduation must have a diploma endorsement (CTE, Academic, or Distinguished). Exceptions to this policy may be granted due to extreme hardship situations and must have the prior approval of the District Superintendent or designee.

For more information regarding the Graduation Requirements for students entering 9th grade in 2018-2019 and there after, visit the following site:

https://www.rcsd.ms/Page/53319 

For students who entered ninth grade prior to the 2018-19 school year:

  • Students must take a math or science course during the senior year.
  • The Rankin County School District requires that all students receiving a diploma do so by earning 28 Carnegie units, based on the diploma under Appendix A-2 of the MPSAS, with additional units in the following areas:
    • Business and Technology - 0.5 units 
    • Electives - 3.5 units
  • Exceptions to the Rankin County School District 28-unit requirement must follow the RCSD Opt-Out Procedures. Note that Opt-Out Procedures are not applicable to students entering ninth grade in 2018-19 school year and thereafter, nor to students accepted into the RCSD Bridge2Success Program.

Summer School and Extended School Year:

The district offers tuition-based summer school for grades in which a Carnegie unit credit can be earned (grades 7-12). Most of these courses are designed for students needing to repeat the subject. A tuition-based extended year program is offered for students in grades 6-8 who fail up to two subjects required for promotion to the next grade. Dates, times, and locations are announced in May of each year. Courses offered are determined at summer school registration and are dependent upon numbers of students requesting certain courses. Principal approval for attendance is required. Students who are dismissed from Summer School/Extended Year due to disciplinary action will not receive credit for the course(s) taken, nor will any fees collected be reimbursed.

Individual Success Plan

What is an Individual Success Plan?

The Individual Success Plan is a course planner created with input from counselors, mentor-teachers, and parents. This college and career ready plan helps students establish and achieve their career and academic goals for success after high school. The ISP is a working plan and should be updated each year. 

The career plan will assist students in the following areas:

  • Provide mentoring and guidance to assist students in career pathway planning
  • Help identify correct graduation pathway options
  • Support changes to meet student needs and ambitions
  • Transition into a profession or postsecondary educational major

Rankin County School District Career Clusters

Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources 
Architecture & Construction 
Arts, A/V Technology & Communications 
Business Management & Administration 
Education & Training EWE
Finance 
Government & Public Administration 
Health Science 
Hospitality & Tourism 
Human Services 
Information Technology 
Law, Public Safety, Corrections & Security 
Manufacturing 
Marketing 
Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics 
Transportation, Distribution & Logistics 


Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources 

The production, processing, marketing, distribution, financing, and development of agricultural commodities and resources including food, fiber, wood products, natural resources, horticulture, and other plant and animal products/resources

Architecture & Construction 

Designing, planning, managing, building, and maintaining the built environments

Arts, A/V Technology & Communications 

Designing, producing, exhibiting, performing, writing, and publishing multimedia content including visual and performing arts and design, journalism, and entertainment services

Business Management & Administration 

Planning, organizing, directing and evaluating business functions essential to efficient and productive business operations

Education & Training EWE

Planning, managing and providing education and training services, and related learning support services

Finance 

Planning and related services for financial and investment planning, banking, insurance, and business financial management

Government & Public Administration 

Planning and executing government functions at the local, state and federal levels, including governance, national security, foreign service, planning, revenue and taxation, and regulations

Health Science 

Planning, managing, and providing therapeutic services, diagnostic services, health informatics, support services, and biotechnology research and development

Hospitality & Tourism 

Preparing individuals for employment in career pathways that relate to families and human needs such as restaurant and food/beverage services, lodging, travel and tourism, recreation, amusement and attractions

Human Services 

Preparing individuals for employment in career pathways that relate to families and human needs such as counseling and mental health services, family and community services, personal care, and consumer services

Information Technology 

Building linkages in IT occupations for entry level, technical, and professional careers related to the design, development, support and management of hardware, software, multimedia, and systems integration services

Law, Public Safety, Corrections & Security 

Planning, managing, and providing legal, protective services, public and homeland security, including professional and technical support services

Manufacturing 

Planning, managing, and performing the processing of materials into intermediate or final products and related professional and technical support activities such as production planning and control, maintenance, manufacturing/process, and engineering

Marketing 

Planning, managing, and performing marketing activities to reach organizational objectives such as brand management, professional sales, merchandising, marketing communications and market research

Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics 

Planning, managing, and providing scientific research and professional and technical services (e.g., physical science, social science, engineering) including laboratory and testing services, and research and development services

Transportation, Distribution & Logistics 

The planning, management, and movement of people, materials, and goods by road, pipeline, air, rail, and water and related professional and technical support services such as transportation infrastructure planning and management, logistics services, mobile equipment, and facility maintenance

7th and 8th Grade Curriculum Information

Arts
Business & Technology
Compensatory Education
Health, Safety, and Physical Education
English Language Arts
Foreign Language
Mathematics
Science
Social Studies
Special Education / Gifted


ARTS

BAND (500903)

This course offers an opportunity for students to develop fundamental skills on musical instruments. This course offers an opportunity for students to develop fundamental skills on musical instruments.

CHORAL MUSIC (500935)

This course is meant to assist students with developing both choral skills and an appreciation of music. 

THEATRE (500510)

This course is designed to stimulate and develop unique intellectual and creative abilities of each student through learning and practicing basic theatre arts concepts. Through an applied emphasis in this course, the student will gain greater knowledge of self and others and will begin to develop an appreciation of theatre as an art form.

VISUAL ARTS (500101)

This course allows students to explore their creative potential while leaning basic art techniques with added emphasis on study of great works of art.

 

BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY

Cyber Foundations I (000284)

2 semesters; 1 unit credit towards High School Graduation

7th Grade

Cyber Foundations II (000286)

2 semesters; 1 unit credit towards High School Graduation

Grade 8

 

Compensatory Education

COMPENSATORY READING (320135)

This course is designed to give intensive, specialized reading instruction adjusted to the needs of a student who does not perform satisfactorily with regular reading instruction within the language arts framework.

LEARNING STRATEGIES (230181) 

The goal of this course is to enhance proficiency in reading, language and mathematics so that students perform better in classes and on standardized tests. Instruction is hands-on and interactive, with opportunities to work collaboratively in groups to solve problems. Students will develop effective study tactics and test taking skills in addition to improving academic abilities. 

**THIS CLASS MAY BE REQUIRED IF STUDENT NEEDS TO BUILD ACADEMIC SKILLS.

 

Health, Safety and Physical Education

HEALTH EDUCATION 7th Grade (340131 )/ 8th Grade (340132)

This course covers topics such as safety and first aid, personal health, human growth and development, mental health, drug abuse prevention, family life, disease prevention, consumer health, nutrition, and environmental health. This is a one-year course that develops health skills needed to improve the quality of life.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION (340111) 

This course encourages development of a life-long habit of physical health and fitness that will help students display appropriate behaviors during social situations. 

**One semester is required in grades 7 and 8 except for band students.

 

English Language Arts

7th Grade English (230101)

In this course, students will read challenging complex texts closely and cite multiple instances of specific evidence to support their assertions. Students will recognize the interplay between setting, plot and, characters and provide an objective summary of a text apart from their own reaction to it. They will compare and contrast different interpretations of a topic, identifying how authors shape their presentation of key information and choose to highlight certain facts over others. In similar fashion, students will trace how an argument develops within a text and assess the validity of the evidence supporting the argument. Students will cite several sources of specific, relevant evidence when supporting their own point of view about texts and topics. Students will also constructively evaluate others’ use of evidence to back up their claims.

8th Grade English (230104)

In this course, students to will read and interact with high-quality, complex nonfiction texts and great works of literature. Students will read narrative and expository informational texts and cite textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis or critique. Students will draw explicitly on their reading and research in discussion and respond to questions constructively by offering up relevant evidence, observations, and ideas. In writing, students will write with increased sophistication, focusing on organizing ideas, concepts, and information into broader categories; choosing relevant facts well; and use varied transitions to clarify or show the relationships among elements. Students will be able to distinguish their claims from alternate or opposing claims and using counterclaims, reasons, and evidence. 

 

Foreign Language

FRENCH (160901)

7th and / or 8th Grade

This course introduces students to the French language, as well as the geography and culture of France. Students develop abilities in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. *

SPANISH (160933)

7th and / or 8th Grade

This course introduces students to the language and culture of Spanish-speaking countries. Emphasis is placed on vocabulary, simple conversational skills, and basic grammar structures.*

*FRENCH OR SPANISH - GRADES 7 AND/OR GRADE 8 - Language courses must be completed in junior high to qualify for enrollment in Level II of the high school foreign language courses. First year foreign language taken in the eighth grade will be accepted for IHL admission provided course content is the same as the high school course. Eighth grade students may receive a Carnegie unit for Level I or Level II foreign language.

 

Mathematics

Mathematics 7 (270101)

7th Grade 

In Grade 7, instruction should focus on four critical areas: (1) developing understanding of and applying proportional relationships; (2) developing understanding of operations with rational numbers and working with expressions and linear equations; (3) solving problems involving scale drawings and informal geometric constructions, and working with two- and three-dimensional shapes to solve problems involving area, surface area, and volume; and (4) drawing inferences about populations based on samples.

Compacted Mathematics (270710)

7th Grade

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

In Compacted Mathematics Grade 7, instruction should focus on four critical areas from Grade 7: (1) developing understanding of and applying proportional relationships; (2) developing understanding of operations with rational numbers and working with expressions and linear equations; (3) solving problems involving scale drawings and informal geometric constructions, and working with two- and three-dimensional shapes to solve problems involving area, surface area, and volume; and (4) drawing inferences about populations based on samples. Instruction should focus on three critical areas from Grade 8: (1) formulating and reasoning about expressions and equations, including modeling an association in bivariate data with a linear equation, and solving linear equations and systems of linear equations; (2) grasping the concept of a function and using functions to describe quantitative relationships; (3) analyzing two- and three-dimensional space and figures using distance, angle, similarity, and congruence, and understanding and applying the Pythagorean Theorem.

Mathematics 8 (270720)

8th Grade

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

In Grade 8, instruction should focus on three critical areas: (1) formulating and reasoning about expressions and equations, including modeling an association in bivariate data with a linear equation, and solving linear equations and systems of linear equations; (2) grasping the concept of a function and using functions to describe quantitative relationships; (3) analyzing two- and three-dimensional space and figures using distance, angle, similarity, and congruence, and understanding and applying the Pythagorean Theorem.

Compacted Mathematics 8/Algebra I (270721)

8th Grade

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

In Compacted Mathematics Grade 8 (with Algebra I), instruction should focus on three critical areas from Grade 8: (1) formulating and reasoning about expressions and equations, including modeling an association in bivariate data with a linear equation, and solving linear equations and systems of linear equations; (2) grasping the concept of a function and using functions to describe quantitative relationships; (3) analyzing two- and three-dimensional space and figures using distance, angle, similarity, and congruence, and understanding and applying the Pythagorean Theorem. Instruction should focus on five critical areas from Algebra 1: (1) analyzing and explaining the process of solving equations and inequalities: (2) learning function notation and developing the concepts of domain and range; (3) using regression techniques; (4) creating quadratic and exponential expressions; and (5) selecting from among these functions to model phenomena.

 

Science

SCIENCE (409907)

7th Grade

This course is designed to investigate structure and function in living things, motions and forces, energy transfer, properties and changes of properties of matter, and the structure of the Earth system. 

SCIENCE (409909)

8th Grade

This course is designed to investigate the joint enterprises of science and technology and their interrelationships in the context of society and the environment. Connections are built that link technology and societal impacts to topics such as structure and function in living systems, energy transfer, and the structure of the Earth system. 

 

Social Studies

WORLD HISTORY FROM PRE-HISTORIC ERA TO THE AGE OF ENLIGHTENMENT

6TH OR 7TH GRADE (450837)

This course focuses on the cultural and historical development from the earliest civilizations and trace the evolution of civilizations from clans to kingdoms, to empires and individual nations and states.

UNITED STATES HISTORY FROM EXPLORATION THROUGH RECONSTRUCTION 

7TH OR 8TH GRADE (450804)

This course focuses on the historical development of the United States by examining the events involving Native Americans and various European settlers, political ideas leading to the development of our democratic society and critical events in the founding of the nation. 

Mississippi Studies (450705)

  • 1 semester; ½ unit credit towards high school graduation

This course is designed to foster an appreciation for the state, its history and its culture. The content will include the geographic, historic, economic, political and social events that have contributed to the state’s development.

Introduction to World Geography (450704)

  • 1 semester; ½ unit credit towards high school graduation

This course requires students to focus on understanding the systems and processes that produce the features and patterns that lie on Earth’s surface and appear on maps and globes.

7th Grade - United States History from Exploration through Reconstruction; Citizenship (451035)

This course will focus on a compacted study of competencies and objectives from Exploration through Reconstruction. 

 

Special Education / Gifted 

Objectives for these courses are based upon each student’s Individualized Education Plan (IEP).

The VENTURE program provides a gifted education curriculum for intellectually gifted students. The classes are open only to those ruled eligible through the district identification process, which includes an IQ test score minimum. Refer to the Rankin County School District Student Handbook for referral process.

9th-12th Grade Curriculum Information

Correspondence Course
Online Course
Recommended Coursework Path
TIPS FOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS
Credit Recovery
Course Load
Class Rankings / Grade Point Average
WEIGHTED COURSES:
Dual Enrollment / Dual Credit
Capstone Projects
Distinguished Service Graduate
Mississippi Scholars Recognition Program
Mississippi Scholars Tech Master


Students interested in earning a high-quality ACT score and qualifying for scholarships upon graduation from high school must follow a strategic academic plan starting in the seventh grade. Rankin County School District recommends the following coursework path for students interested in maximizing their potential for earning scholarships upon graduation.

Correspondence Course

A student can earn only ONE Carnegie unit toward graduation through the completion of a correspondence course. In order to receive credit for a correspondence course, the following criteria must be met:

  1. The principal must approve the correspondence course BEFORE it is taken.
  2. The correspondence course must be taken through an accredited regional or state agency. 
  3. The course must be listed in the official list of courses approved by the Mississippi Department of Education.
  4. Transfer students claiming correspondence course credit from a non-accredited agency will take a standardized achievement test or teacher-made special subject area test to determine whether or not credit will be assigned.

Online Course

A student can earn Carnegie unit credit toward graduation through successful completion of online courses. In order to receive credit for online courses, the following criteria must be met:

  1. The principal must approve the online course. Approval can be denied for any course offered at the school. Requests for taking courses that are a part of the statewide testing program for meeting graduation requirements will be denied.
  2. The online course must be taken through an approved agency and be listed in the current Approved Courses for the Secondary Schools of Mississippi published by the Mississippi Department of Education. The Mississippi Virtual Public School is offered free of charge to students and is currently the sole approved agency for course delivery. (MVPS Website: http://www.connectionsacademy.com/mississippi-school/home.aspx)Recommended Coursework Path

Online course are subject to a yearly fee. See the Online Learning Handbook.

Recommended Coursework Path

9th GRADERS PRE-REGISTERING FOR 10th GRADE

Students who plan to be college and career ready should:

  • Pre-register for courses based on their chosen career pathway
  • Use PSAT or PreACT data to plan Pre-AP classes and/or other accelerated classes
  • consider taking the ACT once IN ADDITION to the free ACT given to sophomores in the spring
  • Prepare for continual ACT growth
  • Continue to update resume 
  • Research future college and career plans

10th GRADERS PRE-REGISTERING FOR 11th GRADE

Students who plan to be college and career ready should:

  • Pre-register for courses based on chosen career pathway
  • Consider taking the PSAT as entrance to the National Merit Scholarship Search
  • Take the ACT OR SAT multiple times in addition to the free ACT all juniors will take in the second semester
  • Attend the RCSD College Fair
  • Research future college and career plans
  • Identify possible scholarship opportunities
  • Consider Dual Enrollment and/or Dual Credit possibilities
  • Consider Advanced Placement classes
  • Complete a successful Capstone project

11th GRADERS PRE-REGISTERING FOR 12TH GRADE

Students who plan to be college and career ready should:

  • Pre-register for courses based on chosen career pathway
  • Take the ACT OR SAT multiple times
  • Attend the RCSD College Fair
  • Research future college and career plans
  • Identify possible scholarship opportunities
  • Consider Dual Enrollment and/or Dual Credit possibilities
  • Consider Advanced Placement classes
  • Complete a successful Capstone project

*For more information concerning the ACT, SAT, or PSAT visit the following websites:

www.act.org

www.collegeboard.org

TIPS FOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

  • Take a science course each school year
  • Take a math course each school year
  • Keep an updated resume 
  • Be aware of requirements for scholarships
  • Take courses which require critical thinking, problem solving, and literacy skills 

Credit Recovery

Students who fail a Carnegie unit course in a RCSD school may be approved to recover that credit by the high school principal. The local school determines the time frame and assignments for credit recovery work, with some opportunities offered during the school year and others during RCSD Summer School. 

Course Load

Students must select courses to fill the entire school day. Students eligible for work release must select courses to fill all but the last period of the school day. Schools can rescind work release if a student is in danger of not meeting minimum state and district requirements for graduation. Schools may establish course requirements specific to an attendance zone.

Class Rankings / Grade Point Average

Students in high school should pay attention to class rankings and grade point averages as determining factors for college scholarship awards and local school honors. Keep in mind that final grades in Carnegie unit courses are averaged through the end of the second semester of the senior year. Rank is computed to the hundredth of a percent, except to break a tie when thousandths of a percent will be used. Averages will be obtained by adding numerical grades using the following scale:

WEIGHTED COURSES:

  • Advanced Placement courses = 1.10 x grade
  • Dual Enrollment/Dual Credit Courses = 1.10 x grade 
  • Advanced Math Plus = 1.05 x grade 
  • Physics = 1.05 x grade
  • Calculus = 1.05 x grade 
  • All other courses= 1.0 x grade 

Dual Enrollment / Dual Credit

This program allows high school students the opportunity to earn college or career technical education credit toward a postsecondary diploma at their local high school. 

Dual Credit Student Eligibility Criteria: 

  • Students must be enrolled in Rankin County School District as a Sophomore, Junior, or Senior
  • Students must have completed a minimum of 10 core high school units (exception: any student who has earned a minimum of 30 on the ACT may be allowed to participate, even if the 10 core credits have not been earned)
  • Students must meet the specific ACT score to enter the intended course. (see your counselor about what scores are needed for each course) The Accuplacer test may be used if the ACT has not been taken.
    • ACT Information (www.act.org) 
    • Accuplacer Test Information (Hinds: 601-936-1821)
  • Students must meet the prerequisite courses, as outlined by the participating post-secondary institution.
  • Students must obtain an unconditional written recommendation from their high school, typically a letter of recommendation from the high school principal.

Dual Credit Information: 

  • Students have the option of taking dual credit classes on the high school campus or online.
  • Students who take classes on the high school campus must pay the $100.00 registration fee per semester enrolled. Students are responsible for costs of all textbook and Instant Access fees. Instant Access fees are billed directly to their My.Hinds account. 
  • Students who take online dual credit classes must pay the $100.00 plus $15.00 per credit hour Distance Learning fee and the Instart Access fees. Online classes are taught through Canvas with a Hinds instructor.
  • Hinds does not send paper bills. All Dual Credit students should utilize their My.Hinds account for billing and payment information.
  • Students will be required to purchase textbooks. Online classes have a mandatory online textbook which are billed directly to their My.Hinds account. 
  • Students grades for the dual credit course will become part of the high school grade point average. Student grades for the high school will be weighted (1.10 times the grades). Remedial Dual Credit courses are NOT weighted. Hinds grades are NOT weighted.
  • Student grades will become part of his or her college transcript and GPA.
  • Students who take a course Dual Enrollment (courses taken on a Hinds campus) must provide a copy of their college grade report to their counselor by the beginning of the following semester.

What do I need to apply for Dual Credit through my high school? 

  • Application on file with Hinds Community College (www.hindscc.edu)
  • Official copy of ACT Scores or Accuplacer Scores
  • High School Transcript
  • Letter of Recommendation from my school’s counselor/administrator

Each school in Rankin County School District offers different courses. Please check with your school’s counselor to see what your school offers and what the required ACT sub score is for each area offered.

Important Information:

  • Students are expected to follow all policies and procedures set forth by Hinds Community College. This includes academic and attendance policies. 
  • Students are responsible for dropping or withdrawing from the course by the date set forth by Hinds Community College.

Capstone Projects

Students of Rankin County School District will complete a Capstone Project during their senior year. The Capstone Project has multiple components that are determined by each local high school, usually inclusive of technology, extensive research, a written research paper, mentorship hours in a chosen career area, oral presentation to an expert panel of judges, and community service. Skills learned by students during the course of this project are useful in post-secondary educational settings and in the workplace.

Distinguished Service Graduate

Students in Rankin County School District have the opportunity to earn the designation of “Distinguished Service Graduate.” This recognition will be marked on the transcript and a seal will be placed on the diploma. Qualifying students may be recognized at Awards Day in the local school, and the designation will be marked in the graduation program. To earn a “Distinguished Service Graduate” honor, a student must document 50 volunteer hours of service per school year during high school, having a total of 200 + volunteer hours of service over the course of his/her high school experience.

Mississippi Scholars Recognition Program

Rankin County School District has partnered with local businesses and the Public Education Forum of Mississippi to motivate students to complete a rigorous course of study in high school. Business leaders may visit classes of 8th grade students prior to pre-registration to emphasize the need for selecting high school courses wisely. Seniors who complete the course requirements and additional expectations will receive recognition.

Course Requirements:

(AP courses are acceptable substitutes) Please see the website mississippischolars.ms for a detailed list of specific course requirements in each subject area)

  • 4 Credits English 
  • 4 Credits Math 
  • 4 Credits Science 
  • 4 Credits Social Studies 
  • 1 Credit Arts
  • 2 Credits Advanced Electives
  • Must have 24 minimum credits – Students may earn a Standard Diploma through the Traditional Pathway

Additional Expectations:

Seniors of 2016-Later

  • 40 hours of community or volunteer service during 4 years of high school
  • 16 ACT Composite score (Overall Score)
  • 2.5 Cumulative high school GPA
  • 95% School attendance during 4 years of high school (excused/unexcused absences)
  • No out-of-school suspensions
  • Must attain a passing score on all end of course exams, as established by the Mississippi Department of Education (MDE)
  • Dual credit courses are acceptable

Mississippi Scholars Tech Master

For information on the Mississippi Scholars Tech Master programs, visit the following website:

http://www.msmec.com/images/MSScholars/2018/TechMasterMap1217.pdf

Course Descriptions Grades 9-12

Arts
Bilingual Education
Driver Education
Business and Technology
Compensatory Education
English / Language Arts
Foreign Language
Health, Safety, and Physical Education
Mathematics
Military Science
Science
Social Studies
Special Education
Capstone / Senior Project
Career Technical Education Approved Courses 


Arts

Band (509901)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

Band gives the student the opportunity to develop instrumental musical skills and to acquire a deep appreciation for music. Band is offered during the regular school day.

Choral Music (500939)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

Choral music provides students experiences in listening to, analyzing, describing, creating, and evaluating music within the constraints of the choral rehearsal situation.

General Music (500971)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

This course includes study of music appreciation, music literature, and music in relation to other arts disciplines. Students may pursue music learning through a variety of means: Cooperative learning group activities, thematic studies, lecture, choral or instrumental performances and use of technology applications. 

Theatre I (500512)

  • 1 semester; ½ unit credit

This course will explore the relationships of theatre history, structure, literature, acting, producing, and critiquing.

Theatre II (500513)

  • 1 semester; ½ unit credit
  • Prerequisite: Theatre I

This course continues to explore the theatrical process as an art form. Students will concentrate on designing, creating, and performing from original and published works.

Theatre III (500515)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit 
  • Prerequisite: Theatre II or Instructor Approval

This course is designed to enable students to continue perfecting and exploring their performance and production abilities.

Visual Arts I (500704)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

Visual Arts I involves a broad range of media, techniques, and processes. Students will continue to develop prior knowledge and skills in the creation and study of works of art and design, building on concepts and skills acquired in the middle level course.

Visual Arts II (500705)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit 
  • Prerequisite: Visual Arts I and/or Instructor Approval

Visual Arts II increases the student’s knowledge of production, critical analysis, history and culture, aesthetics, and connections among the visual arts, other content areas, and everyday life. Work will encompass two- and three-dimensional art forms.

Visual Arts III (500706)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit
  • Prerequisite: Visual Arts II and/or Instructor Approval

This course focuses on the creation and study of more advanced works of art. Students will begin the development of a body of work for inclusion in a portfolio and work at a more advanced level. 

Visual Arts IV (500707)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit
  • Prerequisite: Visual Arts III and/or Instructor Approval

Visual Arts IV focuses on the creation of a portfolio for use in the pursuit of higher education or career opportunities. Advanced-level competencies will provide increasingly difficult and complex artistic challenges.

Advanced Placement Art (500738) - 2D, (500739) - 3D

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit
  • Prerequisite: Visual Arts III and Instructor Approval

AP Art is an advanced art course designed primarily for the highly motivated student. Students are instructed in one of four college level art courses: Studio Art/Drawing Portfolio, 2-D Design Portfolio, 3-D Design Portfolio and History of Art. This is a preparatory course for those students wishing to take the National Advanced Placement Examination. It is possible to earn college credit through this examination.

Photography (500610)

  • 1 semester; ½ unit credit

This course builds on introductory level concepts and skills acquired in visual arts courses and focuses on developing in-depth knowledge and skills in two-dimensional design with photographic media. Concentration will be placed on black and white media, techniques, and processes.

Ceramics I (500540)

  • 1 semester; ½ unit credit

This course focuses on knowledge and skills in three-dimensional design with clay and/or other plastic media. Work will be limited primarily to three-dimensional media, techniques, and processes.

Ceramics II (500541)

  • 1 semester; ½ unit credit
  • Prerequisite: Ceramics I

This course builds on introductory level concepts and skills from Ceramics I. Work will be limited to three-dimensional media, techniques, and processes.

Visual Arts Studio I (500110)

  • 1 or 2 semesters; ½ or 1 unit credit
  • Prerequisite: Instructor approval and previous visual arts training

The studio course is designed to offer specialized instruction in a particular medium, style, or period of the visual arts while connecting projects completed to local community needs. 

Visual Arts Studio II (500111)

  • 1 or 2 semesters; ½ or 1 unit credit
  • Prerequisite: Instructor approval and previous visual arts training

This studio course is an extension of the Visual Arts Studio I course. Students will continue utilization of a particular medium, style, or period of the visual arts while connecting projects completed to local community needs.

Dramatic Criticism and Performance (500531) 

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit
  • Prerequisite: Theatre I, Theatre II or instructor Approval

Dramatic Criticism and Performance is designed to enable students who are interested in the theatre arts to pursue an in-depth exploration of the interrelationships of aesthetics, criticism, and performance. This course is designed for students who have successfully completed Theatre I and Theatre II.

Theatre Production (500521)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit
  • Prerequisite: Instructor Approval

This course provides students an in-depth learning experience in the production aspects of Theatre Arts. Technological design and application and skills of managing, directing, and acting are emphasized.

Bilingual Education

English as a Second Language (160121)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit
  • Prerequisite: Determination of ESL Status

This course is for preparation of ESL students to function adequately in regular education classes.

Driver Education

Driver Education (340151)

  • 1 semester; ½ unit credit
  • Prerequisite: Must be 15 years old by last day of current semester

Driver Education includes classwork, simulator training, and behind-the-wheel training. A student must be fifteen (15) years of age by the last day of the current semester in order to qualify.

Business and Technology

Accounting Fundamentals (110610)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

This course introduces students to the fundamental principles and procedures of accounting. Students will develop financial analysis and decision-making skills that will assist them in future studies and/or career opportunities in business. Students will acquire an understanding of how accounting is used in business operations, as well as how accounting and accounting reports are used by managers, investors and other business stakeholders in their decision making processes. Spreadsheets and accounting software are utilized.

Business Finance (110730)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

The purpose of this course is to introduce the techniques of financial analysis with an emphasis on corporate finance. The concepts developed in this course form the foundation for subsequent business courses at the postsecondary level. The main topics covered include the time value of money and the net present value rule, capital budgeting decisions, uncertainty and the tradeoff between risk and return, and corporate financing and dividend policy decisions. 

Business Fundamentals I (110720)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

This course begins with an introduction to business and marketing fundamentals, communication and interpersonal skills, and professional development for continued education, training, and careers in business management.

Business Fundamentals II (110721)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

This course is a continuation of Business Fundamentals I. Major topics of study in this course are personal finance, business management, and business law.

Business Law (070340)

  • 1 semester; ½ unit credit

This course will give students an understanding of regulations governing business finance, business taxation, and laws governing business practices. 

Entrepreneurship (110640)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

This course introduces students to the rewards and risks of owning or operating a business enterprise. Emphasis is placed on the mastery of skills needed to plan, organize, manage, and finance a small business.

Graphic Design I (070333)

  • 1 Semester; ½ unit credit

Graphic Design I encompasses the foundation skills necessary in the digital media industry. Content such as safety, ethical issues and production, photography, graphic design, and print production will be offered to students.

Graphic Design II (070334)

  • 1 Semester; ½ unit credit
  • Prerequisite: Graphic Design I

This course is related to advanced graphic design. Basic skills learned in Graphic Design I will be used to create more complex layouts with closer tolerances and broader use of colors. Students will utilize programs such as Adobe Photoshop and InDesign to create high quality print and web media.

International Business (110670)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

The International Business course is designed to introduce students to basic business operations surrounding global trade. Competencies for this course focus on raising awareness of the interrelatedness of one country’s political policies and economic practices on another; learning to improve international business relations through appropriate communication strategies; understanding the global business environment; exploring basic concepts underlying international finance, management, marketing, and trade relations; and identifying forms of business ownership and international business opportunities.

Introduction to Information Technology (110600)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

Introduction to Information Technology includes the foundation skills required for building computer systems. Program competencies are designed to prepare students for A+ certification by integrating certification skills throughout the course.

Personal Finance (070128)

  • 1 semester; ½ unit credit

This course provides students with a basic understanding of personal finance so that students may properly manage their own financial affairs. This course will enable students to understand and practice the principles of money management, consumer credit, savings, investments, taxation, and consumer protection.

Management Fundamentals (110690)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

This course focuses on business management and the development of an extensive business plan that encompass all areas of business, including communication and procedures, needed in order to operate a successful business. Students will continue to develop educational, career, and professional plans in the area of business management. 

Management Essentials (110710)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

This course focuses on business management and the development of an extensive business plan that encompass all areas of business, including operations and security, information, and applications, needed in order to operate a successful business. Students will continue to develop educational, career, and professional plans in the area of business management. 

Marketing Essentials (110650)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

Marketing Essentials encompasses introductory marketing concepts such as pricing, promotion, and selling. 

Sales and Distribution (110660)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

Sales and Distribution is designed around providing students with advanced marking skills. Content includes distribution, marketing planning, product service management, international marketing, and various other marketing specializations. 

Exploring Computer Science (110142)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

Exploring Computer Science (ECS) is designed to introduce students to the breadth of the field of computer science through an exploration of engaging and accessible topics. Student will develop the computational practices of algorithm development, problem solving and programming within the context of problems that are relevant to the lives of today’s students. Students will also be introduced to topics such as interface design, limits of computers, and societal and ethical issues.

Web Design and Media Rich Content (110700)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

Web Design and Media Rich Content emphasizes real-world, hands-on practice. Content related to Web design, building a basic client Web site, media rich content for Web design, and planning a digital narrative and creating a script will be offered to students.

Compensatory Education

ACT/SAT Prep I (110216)

  • 1 semester; ½ unit credit
  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credits

Within this course, students will develop effective test taking skills. Preparation materials for the ACT and National Merit Qualifying Test will be used. This class is open to 10th and 11th graders. It is a requirement that the student take either the PSAT, SAT, or ACT while enrolled in this class. 

ACT/SAT Prep II (110221)

  • 1 semester; ½ unit credit
  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credits
  • Prerequisite: ACT/SAT Prep I

This course will continue to develop effective test taking strategies. Preparation materials for the ACT and National Merit Qualifying Test will be used. The results of the PSAT will be used to target specific learning needs of each individual student in the areas of language, reading, math and science. Additionally, this course may include preparation for success on ACT Workkeys. This course is open to sophomores through seniors who have previously taken ACT prep I.

Learning Strategies (230180)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

The goal of this course is to enhance proficiency in reading, language and mathematics so students perform better in classes and on standardized tests. This class can include instructional skill tactics for the PSAT, SAT, ACT, and ACT Workkeys test. PSAT data from Ninth grade students can be used second semester to provide guided studies. Instruction is hands-on and interactive, with opportunities to work collaboratively in groups to solve problems. Students will develop effective study tactics and test taking skills, in addition to improving academic abilities.

  • **THIS CLASS MAY BE REQUIRED FOR STUDENTS SCORING MINIMAL OR BASIC ON STANDARDIZED TESTS. 

Employability Skills (320120)

  • 1 semesters; ½ unit credit

This course targets getting students ready for the job force. Students will create a resume, work on job interview skills, fill out applications, discuss job opportunities and related educational needs, and write business communications. Career planning will be a major part of this course.

English / Language Arts

English I (230107)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

In this course, students will investigate a wide range of literary genres as well as delve deeply into substantive, complex expository works of nonfiction and uncover critical clues for building analyses of texts. Students will provide objective summaries that incorporate both inferences drawn from the text and citations extracted directly from what they have read. Students will study the seminal foundational documents of the United States as well as grasp differing perspectives and points of view embedded in works of world literature.

English II (230110)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

In this course, students will examine a diverse set of literary genres and pursue their investigation of substantive, complex expository works of nonfiction and analyze the meaning of both literary and nonfiction works. Students will compare and contrast how ideas, themes or concepts are presented in two different artistic mediums in which different details are emphasized. Students will analyze seminal foundational documents of the United States as well as grasp differing perspectives and points of view embedded in works of world literature. 

English III (230113)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

In this course, students will understand and analyze substantive, complex expository works of literary nonfiction as well as a diverse spectrum of stories, poems, plays, and novels. Students will perform a variety of complex reading tasks focused on recurrent themes in American literature and foundational works of American political philosophy. Students will become skilled at determining how multiple themes or ideas combine and intertwine to produce a complex narrative or explanation as well as evaluate the premises, arguments, and rhetoric present in seminal texts from American history.

English IV (230116)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

In this course, students will analyze more substantive, complex expository works of literary nonfiction as well as a diverse spectrum of stories, poems, plays, and novels. Students will perform a variety of complex reading tasks focused on recurrent themes in American literature and foundational works of American political philosophy with more independence. Students will strengthen their skills in determining how multiple themes or ideas combine and intertwine to produce a complex narrative or explanation as well as evaluate the premises, arguments, and rhetoric present in seminal texts from American history.

Advanced Placement English Language and Composition (230117)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit
  • Prerequisite: Instructor Approval
  • Weighted course for GPA (1.10)

This course engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of rhetorical contexts and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. Through writing and reading, students will become aware of the interactions among a writer’s purposes, audience expectations, and subjects, as well as the way genre conventions and the resources of language contribute to effectiveness in writing. Students will read complex texts with understanding and write prose of sufficient richness and complexity to communicate effectively with mature readers.

Advanced Placement English Literature & Composition (230174)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit
  • Prerequisite: Instructor Approval 
  • Weighted course for GPA (1.10)

This course engages students in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. Through the close reading of selected texts, students will deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. Students will consider a work’s structure, style and themes, as well as such smaller-scale elements as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism and tone. The course includes intensive study of representative works from various genres and periods, concentrating on works of recognized literary merit.

Foundations of Journalism (270603)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

This course is intended as a general course to enhance students’ communication and media literacy skills and to help students produce a factual, journalistically-sound piece of writing from interviews they conducted. Students will be able to create at least one accompanying visual element (photo/video) and publish their work (story + visual) to the web.

Broadcast Journalism (100104)

  • 1 or 2 semesters; ½ or 1 unit credit
  • Prerequisite: Foundations of Journalism

The course will provide students with quality academic instruction in television, radio, and video production by providing training in operating equipment, reporting and scriptwriting, as well as planning, directing, and producing video projects. This course is designed to help students produce a broadcast news show that includes anchor segments, field reports, and feature segments. Students should select all content, write all scripts, and film and edit all video. Show(s) should be published to the web and available to the public. 

Creative Writing (230511)

  • ½ unit credit (1 unit credit if dual credit)
  • Prerequisite: English II

The Creative Writing course will provide the student practices in the processes of composing poems, personal descriptive and narrative essays, and short fiction. If time allows, the writing of drama may be pursued. The course affords an opportunity for self-expression, promotes critical thinking, expands the imagination, and develops the use of figurative and literal language. The student will pursue an independent project in creative writing. The student will become a critical reader and editor of his/her own work and of the work of his/her classmates. The student will be encouraged to submit works for publication.

Debate (231026)

  • 1 or 2 semesters; ½ or 1 unit credit

This course provides instruction in how to acquire, analyze, and evaluate information in order to organize effective arguments, and it provides practice in making those arguments persuasively.

Print Journalism (270604)

  • 1 or 2 semesters; ½ or 1 unit credit

This course provides students with quality academic instruction in newspaper/yearbook/news-site production by providing training in reporting, writing, photography, design, and equipment operation, as well as in leadership and management skills (necessary to plan and execute the publication process). This course is designed to help students produce a newspaper, news magazine, news website, or yearbook that informs a defined audience of school and community news in a timely manner.

Mississippi Writers (230761)

  • 1 or 2 semesters; ½ or 1 unit credit

This course focuses on the state’s rich literary heritage through the study of poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and drama. The course identifies major sources and themes of twentieth century and contemporary Mississippi writing. The student will recognize the contribution of Mississippi writers, such as William Faulkner, Eudora Welty, Richard Wright, Willie Morris, and Anne Moody. This course recognizes that Mississippi writing is an expression of a particular place that achieves universality. 

Oral Communication (231010)

  • 1 or 2 semesters; ½ or 1 unit credit

This course includes instruction in how to acquire, analyze, and evaluate information in order to make decisions and establish satisfying relationships. Skill in oral communication helps the student to think logically, clearly, and creatively.

Technical and Workplace Writing (230142)

  • 1 or 2 semesters; ½ or 1 unit credit

This course focuses on the various kinds of written communication currently occurring in a variety of workplaces and careers. Students will gain a sense of general principles of communication, learn how audience and purpose shape the form and content of the written piece, and discern how organization, wording, accuracy and specificity of details, typography, visuals, design, grammar, usage, and mechanics contribute to effective communication. Students will apply what they have learned by creating a variety of kinds of written communication. Students will practice gathering information through research as well as communicate information through various kinds of writing. 

Survey of African American Literature (230124)

  • 1 or 2 semesters; ½ or 1 unit credit

The Survey of African American Writing course is a survey course that draws upon a compilation of genres, themes, styles, and language used by various writers of African American descent. The student will recognize and appreciate contributions of selected authors through reading, speaking, and viewing selected works and by researching and writing.

Survey of 20th Century Writing (230125)

  • 1 or 2 semesters; ½ or 1 unit credit

The Survey of Twentieth Century Writing course covers major writers and themes in the Americas and Western Europe for the period from World War I to the present time. The student will recognize major themes present in twentieth century writing and will draw parallels to history and present day concerns. As a result of this course, students will have a greater awareness of events and writings that have shaped and been part of the ideas and culture of the twentieth century. 

World Literature (230144)

  • 1 or 2 semesters; ½ or 1 unit credit

The World Literature course is an examination of literary works that have contributed significantly to the thinking of humankind and have contributed greatly to various cultures. In this course, students will read a variety of masterpieces and influential literary works. The one-semester World Literature course may focus mainly on one time period or span centuries to show the range of literary heritage, whereas the one-year course will require reading of literature from the ancient classical period to the twentieth century.

SREB Literacy Ready (230150)

  • 2 Semesters; 1 unit credit
  • English (Supplemental Fourth-Year or Senior English)

This Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) course is designed to build on knowledge gained in English I, English II, and English III, and is offered only to Seniors (12th graders). This course utilizes a disciplinary literacy approach that teaches students strategies for reading and understanding complex texts in different subject areas. Students learn to develop and defend ideas from textbooks and write about them in college-level formats for English, history and biology. The unit structure conforms to the framework of the Literacy Design Collaborative (LDC), which addresses college- and career-readiness standards. This course is for students who have an ACT English subscore below 15 only. 

Essentials for College Literacy (230185)

  • 2 Semesters; 1 unit credit
  • English (Supplemental Fourth-Year or Senior English)

Essentials for College Literacy is designed to build on knowledge gained in English I, English II, and English III, and is offered only to Seniors (12th graders). This course utilizes a disciplinary literacy approach that teaches students strategies for reading and understanding complex texts in different subject areas. Students learn to develop and defend ideas from textbooks and write about them in college-level formats for English, history and biology. The unit structure conforms to the framework of the Literacy Design Collaborative (LDC), which addresses college- and career-readiness standards. This course is for students with an ACT English subscore of 15-18 only. This course meets remediation requirements for all IHL and some CC.

Foreign Language

French I (160903)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

This course introduces students to the French language, as well as the geography and culture of France. Students develop abilities in listening, speaking, reading and writing in this Romance language. 

French II (160904)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit
  • Prerequisite: French I, Grade 8

French II stresses grammar and composition as well as more advanced study in comprehension, conversational skills, and general fluency in the French language. Language behavior moves from imitative to reflective.

French III (160905)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit
  • Prerequisite: French II

This course stresses conversational and cultural skills within the context of a wide variety of materials (expository, descriptive, narrative, poetic).

French IV (160906)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit
  • Prerequisite: French III

Students in this course will hone conversational and reading skills in this language, while continuing to learn about the cultural aspects of the countries that speak the language. A wide variety of materials (expository, descriptive, narrative, poetic) will be utilized.

Spanish I (160933)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

This course introduces students to the language and culture of Spanish-speaking countries. Emphasis is placed on vocabulary, simple conversational skills, and basic grammar structures. 

Spanish II (160934)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit
  • Prerequisite: Spanish I, Grade 8

This course continues study of the fundamentals of Spanish grammar and composition. Students will engage in advanced conversations using more advanced vocabulary than in Spanish I. Translation of Spanish literature will be assigned. Language behavior moves from imitative to reflective.

Spanish III(160935)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit
  • Prerequisite: Spanish II

Spanish III stresses conversational and cultural skills. Major areas of study are Spanish literature, history and customs. Emphasis is placed on speaking and writing in Spanish.

Spanish IV (160936)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit
  • Prerequisite: Spanish III

Students in this course will hone conversational and reading skills in this language, while continuing to learn about the cultural aspects of the countries that speak the language. A wide variety of materials (expository, descriptive, narrative, poetic) will be utilized.

Health, Safety, and Physical Education

Contemporary Health (340133)

  • 1 semester; ½ unit credit

Contemporary Health is a course that develops skills related to personal, social, and mental health in today’s society. It includes instruction on human growth and development, disease prevention and control, substance abuse and prevention, community and environmental health, and safety and first aid. 

Mathematics

Algebra I (270404)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

In Algebra I, the fundamental purpose of this course is to formalize and extend the mathematics that students learned in the middle grades. Because it is built on the middle grades standards, this is a more ambitious version of Algebra I than has generally been offered. Instruction should focus on five critical areas: (1) analyze and explain the process of solving equations and inequalities: (2) learn function notation and develop the concepts of domain and range; (3) use regression techniques; (4) create quadratic and exponential expressions; and (5) select from among these functions to model phenomena.

Geometry (270408)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

The fundamental purpose of this course is to formalize and extend students’ geometric experiences from the middle grades. Students explore more complex geometric situations and deepen their explanations of geometric relationships, moving towards formal mathematical arguments. Important differences exist between this Geometry course and the historical approach taken in Geometry classes. Close attention should be paid to the introductory content for the Geometry conceptual category found in the high school . The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. In Geometry Plus, students will engage in (+) standards, including taking a look at additional constructions and using Cavalieri’s Principle to make sense of volume formulas. Students will also prove geometric mean statements using similarity in right triangles and use truth tables to show that a statement and its contrapositive are logically equivalent.

Algebra II (270405)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit
  • Prerequisite: Algebra I and Geometry

In this Algebra II course students build on their work with linear, quadratic, and exponential functions and students extend their repertoire of functions to include polynomial, rational, and radical functions. Students work closely with the expressions that define the functions, and continue to expand and hone their abilities to model situations and to solve equations, including solving quadratic equations over the set of complex numbers and solving exponential equations using the properties of logarithms. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout this course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. The four critical areas of this course include (1) working extensively with polynomial operations; (2) building connections between Geometry and trigonometric ratios; (3) understanding of a variety of function families; and (4) explore statistical data. In Algebra II Plus, students will engage in (+) standards, including taking a closer look at inverse functions and composition of functions. Students will use the Binomial Theorem to expand binomials and engage in a brief study of matrices.

Advanced Mathematics Plus (270730)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit
  • Prerequisite: Algebra II

Advanced Mathematics Plus specifies the mathematics that students should study in order to be college and career ready. The Advanced Mathematics Plus Course includes additional mathematics from the College and Career Readiness Standards for Mathematics indicated by a (+). These “plus standards” will help students in advanced courses such as Calculus. This course was designed to be a fourth year math course. Throughout the duration of this course, the Standards for Mathematical Practice are addressed.

Algebra III (270441)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit
  • Prerequisite: Algebra II

Algebra III includes content standards from the 2007 Mississippi Mathematics Framework Revised Pre-Calculus course and the College and Career Readiness Standards for Mathematics, and covers those skills and objectives necessary for success in courses higher than Algebra II and Integrated Mathematics III. Topics of study include sequences and series, functions, and higher order polynomials. Polynomial functions provide the context for higher-order investigations. Topics are addressed from a numeric, graphical, and analytical perspective. 

Calculus (279912)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit
  • Prerequisite: Advanced Mathematics Plus or Algebra III or DC College Algebra

This Calculus course includes content standards from the 2007 Mississippi Mathematics Framework Revised. This course focuses on the mathematics of change. The major focus is on differential and integral calculus. The use of graphing calculators and other technologies are major components of the course. The instructional approach should provide opportunities for students to work together collaboratively and cooperatively as they solve routine and non-routine problems. Communication strategies should include reading, writing, speaking, and critical listening as students present and evaluate mathematical arguments, proofs, and explanations about their reasoning. 

SREB Math Ready (270740)

  • 2 Semesters; 1 unit credit
  • Prerequisite: Algebra II

This Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) course is designed to build on knowledge gained in Algebra 1, Geometry, and Algebra II and is offered only to Seniors (12th graders). This course emphasizes the deep understanding of math concepts beyond memorizing formulas and procedures. Students explore the justification behind the procedure, i.e. “why” to use a certain formula or method to solve a problem by being immersed in critical-thinking experiences where they apply math skills, functions and concepts in different real-world contexts. The goal of this course is to help prepare students for material they will see in career and/or college level courses. This course is for students with an ACT math subscore below 15 only.

Essentials for College Math (270715)

  • 2 Semesters; 1 unit credit
  • Prerequisite: Algebra I

Essentials for College Math is designed to build on knowledge gained in Algebra 1, Geometry, and Algebra II and is offered only to Seniors (12th graders). This course emphasizes the deep understanding of math concepts beyond memorizing formulas and procedures. Students explore the justification behind the procedure, i.e. “why” to use a certain formula or method to solve a problem by being immersed in critical-thinking experiences where they apply math skills, functions and concepts in different real-world contexts. The goal of this course is to help prepare students for material they will see in career and/or college level courses. This course is for students with an ACT math subscore of 15-18 only. This course meets remediation requirements for all IHL and some CC.

Advanced Placement (AP) Calculus AB (279908)/ Calculus BC (279909)

  • 2 Semesters; 1 unit credit
  • Prerequisite: Advanced Mathematics Plus

AP courses in Calculus consist of a full high school academic year of work and are 

Comparable to calculus courses in colleges and universities. It is expected that students who take an AP course in calculus will seek college credit, college placement, or both from institutions of higher learning. The AP Program includes specifications for two calculus courses and the exam for each course. The two courses and the two corresponding exams are designated as Calculus AB and Calculus BC. 

Calculus AB can be offered as an AP course by any school that can organize a curriculum for students with mathematical ability. Calculus AB is designed to be taught over a full high school academic year. It is possible to spend some time on elementary functions and still teach the Calculus AB curriculum within a year. However, if students are to be adequately prepared for the Calculus AB Exam, most of the year must be devoted to the topics in differential and integral calculus. These topics are the focus of the AP Exam questions. 

Calculus BC is a full-year course in the calculus of functions of a single variable. It includes all topics taught in Calculus AB plus additional topics, but both courses are intended to be challenging and demanding; they require a similar depth of understanding of topics.

Advanced Placement (AP) Statistics (270535)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit
  • Prerequisite: Algebra II

The AP statistics course introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: 

  1. Exploring Data: Describing patterns and departures from patterns 
  2. Sampling and Experimentation: Planning and conducting a study 
  3. Anticipating Patterns: Exploring random phenomena using probability and simulation 
  4. Statistical Inference: Estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses 

Students who successfully complete the course and exam may receive credit, advanced placement or both for a one-semester introductory college statistics course.

Military Science

JROTC I (280311)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

The Army Junior ROTC program introduces students to the basics involved in assuming leadership roles. Cadets are challenged mentally on topics, which include marksmanship and safety, map reading, first aid, and communication techniques. Physical challenges are also involved to build self-awareness.

JROTC II (280312)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit
  • Prerequisite: JROTC I

This course is a continuation of JROTC I and involves intermediate leadership training. Cadets will learn basic management skills, become physically conditioned, and practice problem solving in practical situations. The course will discuss career opportunities and the role of the army and technology.

JROTC III (280313)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit
  • Prerequisite: JROTC II

This course is a continuation of JROTC II. Cadets progress into an applied leadership situation with responsibilities of command and administrative duties including planning and execution of JROTC activities.

JROTC IV (280314)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit
  • Prerequisite: JROTC III

JROTC IV is a continuation of JROTC III and involves advanced leadership training. Completion of this level may lead to advanced rank at the college level and/or a JROTC college scholarship. Topics include drug awareness/prevention, military history, command and staff procedures, marksmanship, and career opportunities. Cadets will work toward completion of the President’s Physical Fitness Test.

Science

Foundations of Biology (260628)

  • 2 semesters: 1 unit credit

Foundations of Biology is a research and inquiry-based course designed to give students the basic knowledge needed prior to attempting the rigorous Biology course required for graduation. This course is NOT a required prerequisite for Biology. Foundations of Biology should not be taken after the successful completion of Biology. Concepts covered in this course include the history of biology and its impacts on society, the chemistry of life, organization and energy in living systems, the molecular basis of heredity, biological evolution, and ecological principles.

Biology I (260131)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

Biology is a laboratory-based course that is designed to build a life science foundation emphasizing patterns, processes, and interactions among organisms. Students are expected to master conceptual understandings of the organization of life; the interdependence between organisms and their environment; the chemical composition of life; the role of DNA, RNA, and protein in cellular structure and function; inheritance; and evolution through the analysis of science literature, scientific investigations, and by forming and defending scientific claims with evidence. 

Advanced Placement Biology (260143)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit
  • Prerequisite: Biology I and Chemistry/Instructor Approval

This is a preparatory course for students wishing to take the National Advanced Placement Examination in order to earn college credit. AP Biology includes the facts, principles, and processes of biology. Topics covered include biochemistry, molecular and cellular biology, genetics, plant and animal tissues, and taxonomy. Students can earn college credit through examination after taking this course.

Biomedical Research (260502)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit
  • Prerequisite: Biology I and Chemistry 

Biomedical Research is an inquiry-based, technology-oriented, laboratory intensive course that challenges students to solve biomedical research problems similar to those encountered in a university setting and communicate findings in written and oral summaries. Fundamental principles of chromatographic separation, theory and use of a spectrophotometer, quantitative analysis of protein concentration and preparation of DNA are some of the laboratory exercises that will be conducted.

Botany (260311)

  • 1 semester; ½ unit credit

Botany is a laboratory-based course applying basic biological principles to the study of plants. Topics include morphological characteristics of each division and variation in their reproduction, physiology, taxonomy, evolution, and the interactions of human society and plants. Laboratory activities, research, the use of technology, and the effective communication of results through various methods are integral components of this course. It is recommended that Botany is taken after the successful completion of Biology.

Genetics (260613)

  • 1 semester; ½ unit credit

Genetics is a laboratory-based course that explores the principles of classical and molecular genetics. The structure and function relationship of DNA forms the foundation for the study of DNA inheritance, RNA and protein production, and the resulting phenotypes in organisms. Classical Mendelian genetics is explored to analyze patterns of inheritance and genetic variability within populations. Multiple applications of biotechnology are investigated to address a variety of problems in modern society.

Human Anatomy and Physiology (260751)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

Human Anatomy and Physiology iis a laboratory-based course that investigates the structures and functions of the human body. Core content emphasizes the structure and function of cells, tissues, and organs; organization of the human body and its biochemical composition; the skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, digestive, respiratory, cardiovascular, integumentary, immune, urinary, and reproductive systems; and the impact of diseases on certain systems. Laboratory activities, research, the use of technology, and the effective communication of results through various methods are integral components of this course. It is recommended that Human Anatomy and Physiology be taken after successful completion of Biology. 

Microbiology (260501)

  • MDE Approval ONLY - IHL, University or Post- Secondary Partnership required
  • 1 semester; ½ unit credit

Microbiology is a lab-based course that investigates microorganisms and the various roles they play in our living world. Topics explored in the class will include: identification of common microbes, culturing and staining microorganisms, host-microbe relationships and disease processes, and uses of microbiology in industry. Lab work involving microscopic investigations and aseptic techniques will be emphasized, along with critical thinking, problem solving and research.

Zoology I (260701)

  • 1 semester; ½ unit credit
  • Prerequisite: Biology I

Zoology I is a laboratory-based course that surveys the morphology, taxonomy, anatomy, and physiology of invertebrates. Comparative studies are addressed during laboratory observations and dissections. Laboratory activities, research, the use of technology, and the effective communication of results through various methods are integral components of this course. It is recommended that Zoology I and/or Zoology II be taken after the successful completion of Biology. NOTE: Students do not have to complete Zoology I before enrolling in Zoology II.

Zoology II (260697)

  • 1 semester; ½ unit credit
  • Prerequisite: Biology I

Zoology II is a laboratory-based course that surveys the morphology, taxonomy, anatomy, and physiology of vertebrates. Comparative studies are addressed during laboratory observations and dissections. Laboratory activities, research, the use of technology, and the effective communication of results through various methods are integral components of this course. It is recommended that Zoology I and/or Zoology II be taken after the successful completion of Biology. NOTE: Students do not have to complete Zoology I before enrolling in Zoology II.

Physical Science (400700)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

Physical Science provides opportunities for students to develop and communicate a basic understanding of physics and chemistry through lab-based activities, integrated STEM activities, inquiry, suitable mathematical expressions, and concept exploration. The Physical Science course will prepare students for the transition to other science courses and to become informed citizens of a modern world that is constantly changing. To be successful in Physical Science, it is recommended that students have completed Algebra I or be enrolled in this math course.

Chemistry I (400519)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit
  • Prerequisite: Algebra I and Biology I
  • Co-requisite: Algebra II

Chemistry is an elective and designed to be a rigorous course to prepare students for careers in science, technology, and engineering, Chemistry explores empirical concepts central to all areas of science. These concepts will be explored in-depth using both quantitative and qualitative analysis, computational and experimental rigor, and inquiry-based methods. Cornerstone objectives of chemistry that must be addressed and readdressed throughout the course are dimensional analysis, naming compounds, balancing equations, and stoichiometry. To be successful in Chemistry, it is recommended that students have completed Algebra I, and be enrolled in an upper level math course. 

Advanced Placement Chemistry (400523) 

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit
  • Prerequisite: Algebra II, Chemistry and Instructor Approval

Weighted course for GPA (1.10)

AP Chemistry is a preparatory course for those students wishing to take the National Advanced Placement Examination. It is possible to earn college credit through this examination. This course deals with advanced concepts in chemistry. Laboratory work and chemical problem solving are an integral part of the course.

Physics I (400820)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit
  • Prerequisites: Algebra II, Geometry, or Trigonometry

Physics provides opportunities for students to develop and communicate an understanding of matter and energy through lab-based activities, integrated STEM activities, mathematical expressions, and concept exploration. Concepts covered in this course include kinematics, dynamics, energy, mechanical and electromagnetic waves, and electricity. Laboratory activities, uses of technology, effective communication of results, and research of contemporary scientific theories through various methods are integral components of this course. To be successful in Physics, it is recommended that students have completed Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II and be enrolled in an upper level math course. 

Astronomy (400211)

  • MDE Approval ONLY - IHL, University or Post- Secondary Partnership required
  • 1 semester; ½ unit credit

This course will provide opportunities for students to develop and communicate an understanding of astronomy through lab-based activities, mathematical expressions, and concept exploration. The history of astronomy, technology and instruments, Kepler’s and Newton’s Laws, celestial bodies, and other components of the universe will be studied.

Environmental Science (260611)

  • 1 semester; ½ unit credit

Environmental science is a laboratory- or field-based course that explores ways in which the environment shapes living communities. Human sustainability and environmental balance are emphasized. Laboratory activities, research, the use of technology, and the effective communication of results through various methods are integral components of this course, 

Field Experiences in Science Courses (269998) 

  • MDE Approval ONLY - IHL, University or Post- Secondary Partnership required
  • 1 semester; ½ unit credit

Field experiences may be added to any high school level science course and given a time allotment equivalent to one semester. It must be used for laboratory or field-based instruction.

Earth and Space Science (260629)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

The Earth and Space science course provides opportunities for students to continue to develop and communicate a basic understanding of the Earth and its place in the universe through lab-based activities, integrated STEM activities, inquiry, mathematical expressions, and concept exploration. The Earth and Space science course will help students apply scientific concepts in natural settings and guide them to become responsible stewards of Earth’s natural resources.

Foundations of Science Literacy (260627)

  • 1 semester; ½ unit credit

Foundations of Science Literacy is designed as an inquiry-based ACT science preparation course in which objectives from the ACT College and Career Readiness Standards - Science are included. The course also includes basic skills that include analyzing technical texts and graphics.

Marine and Aquatic Science I (260625)

  • 1 semester; ½ unit credit

Marine and Aquatic Science I is a laboratory-based course that investigates the biodiversity of salt water and fresh water organisms, including their interactions with the physical and chemical environment. Science and engineering practices, cross-cutting concepts, nature of science, and technology are incorporated into the standards. Special emphasis relating to human impacts and career opportunities are integral components of this course. Marine and Aquatic Science I must be taken before Marine and Aquatic Science II. It is recommended that Marine and Aquatic Science I and II be taken after the successful completion of Biology.

Marine and Aquatic Science II (260626)

  • 1 semester; ½ unit credit
  • Prerequisite: Marine and Aquatic Science I

Marine and Aquatic Science II is a laboratory-based course that investigates the biodiversity of salt water and fresh water organisms, including their interactions with the physical and chemical environment. Science and engineering practices, cross-cutting concepts, nature of science, and technology are incorporated into the standards. Special emphasis relating to human impacts and career opportunities are integral components of this course. Marine and Aquatic Science I must be taken before Marine and Aquatic Science II. It is recommended that Marine and Aquatic Science I and II be taken after the successful completion of Biology.

Social Studies

Mississippi Studies (450705)

  • 1 semester; ½ unit credit

The student will understand and develop an appreciation for the geography, history, government, literature, art, and music that contributed to the development of Mississippi as a state.

Introduction to World Geography (450704)

  • 1 semester; ½ unit credit

This course requires students to focus on understanding the systems and processes that produce the features and patterns that lie on Earth’s surface and appear on maps and globes.

World History: Enlightenment to Present (450835)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

This World History course focuses on the development, connections, and global influences of the “Western World.” Students will acquire an understanding of change over time, analyze primary and secondary sources, make written and oral arguments based on evidence in support of a defined thesis, and develop a command of major geographic features.

Advanced Placement World History (450836)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit
  • Prerequisite: Instructor Approval
  • Weighted course for GPA (1.10)

This is a preparatory course for students wishing to take the National Advanced Placement Examination in order to earn college credit. The purpose of the course is to develop greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contacts, in interaction with different types of human societies. 

United States History: Post-Reconstruction to Present (450811) 

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

U. S. History- Post-Reconstruction to Present requires students to examine the major turning points in American history.

Advanced Placement United States History (450814)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit
  • Prerequisite: Instructor Approval
  • Weighted course for GPA (1.10)

Advanced Placement U. S. History is a basic survey of U.S. history, beginning with colonization and continuing through current issues. This is a preparatory course for those students wishing to take the National Advanced Placement Examination. It is possible to earn college credit through this examination.

United States Government (451004)

  • 1 semester; ½ unit credit

U.S. Government provides an understanding of the foundations of the United States government, an understanding of the inalienable rights, civil rights, civil liberties of an American, the duties and responsibilities of citizens of the United States, the American political process, the three branches of United States government, and relates the study of United States government to current issues. 

Advanced Placement United States Government-Politics (451008)

  • 1 semester; ½ unit credit or 2 semesters; 1 unit credit
  • Prerequisite: Instructor Approval
  • Weighted course for GPA (1.10)

This is a preparatory course for students wishing to earn college credit through taking the National Advanced Placement Examination. The course of study involves the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific case studies. Students will increase familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that form the political reality in our nation.

Economics (450601)

  • 1 semester; ½ unit credit

Economics provides an awareness of the relationship of world economic systems. The student will study the American economic system and the impact of that system in a global setting. Students will develop an understanding of microeconomics and macroeconomics from individual finances to world economic organizations.

Advanced Placement Macroeconomics (450623)

  • 1 semester; ½ unit credit
  • Prerequisite: Instructor Approval
  • Weighted course for GPA (1.10)

This is a preparatory course for students planning to take the National Advanced Placement Examination in an effort to earn college credit. The course will give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole. Emphasis will be placed on the study of national income and price-level determination, economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth and international economics.

Advanced World Geography (450711)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

Advanced World Geography focuses on understanding the systems and processes that produce the features and patterns that lie on the Earth’s surface and appear on maps and globes. Themes include relationships and interdependencies among countries that are produced by global, political, socio/cultural, economic systems, the dynamic interaction between human activity and the physical environment; human use of resources, and the importance of culture in shaping the unique ways of life in places and regions around the world. 

Community Service Learning (459912)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

This course involves active learning, requiring students to draw lessons from the experience of performing service work. The main components are planning projects, performing services, and analyzing/reflecting experiences. 

Field Experiences (450902)

  • 1 semesters; ½ unit credit

This course is designed to be paired with another social studies course and will entail field-based instruction and real world laboratory style experiences. 

Law Related Education (220101)

  • 1 semester; ½ unit credit

Law Related Education gives students an understanding of the legal process and the legal system as it relates to youth and adults. A greater awareness of local, state, and federal law will be gained by students. Topics include change in law over time, tort law, family law, and criminal law. Students will read different sources critically and make arguments orally in writing and based on evidence in support of a clearly defined thesis. 

Local Culture (450251)

  • 1 semester; ½ unit credit

This course is designed to investigate the cultural diversity of a local area through a study of its history, economics, politics, and geography. Using contact and information about local culture, literary heritage and people, students should understand and appreciate the development of their local area.

Personal Leadership I (459914)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

This course in Personal Leadership is focused on preparing students for leadership roles in the school and community. Students will examine characteristics and styles of leaders as they work toward developing personal skills at directing others toward a goal. Opportunities will be made available to demonstrate abilities and to practice the strategies necessary to lead others.

Psychology (420111)

  • 1 semester; ½ unit credit

Psychology focuses on the history, advances in technology, and both internal and external influences that affect human mental development. The student will learn the various elements of human behavioral development that emphasize concepts such as “self-esteem” and “self-responsibility.”

Sociology (451121)

  • 1 semester; ½ unit credit 

Sociology engages in the study of people and their life in groups. This will be done by examining how people behave in groups and how interaction shapes both individual and group behaviors. The analysis of the rules, organizations, and value systems that enable people to live together will also be an area of emphasis.

Personal Leadership (459914)

  • 1 semester; ½ unit credit

Designed to provide an experiential learning experience. This course is presented in thematic units using various learning experiences. 

African-American Studies (230425)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

A survey course that studies the contributions Africa has made to the development of the world in general and the social, political, cultural, and economic development of the United States, in particular. 

Survey of World Religions (380260)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

a critical survey of the world’s major religions, including the philosophical and sociocultural manifestations of these religions.

Special Education

Objectives for these courses are based upon each student’s Individualized Education Plan (IEP) and the Mississippi Occupational Diploma Curriculum devised for each course.

Capstone / Senior Project

Capstone/Senior Project (000254)

  • ½ or 1 unit credit

Students of Rankin County School District will complete a Capstone Project during their senior year. The Capstone Project has multiple components that are determined by each local high school, usually inclusive of technology, extensive research, a written research paper, mentorship hours in a chosen career area, oral presentation to an expert panel of judges, and community service. Skills learned by students during the course of this project are useful in post-secondary educational settings and in the workplace.

College- and Career- Readiness Course (110410)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

This course introduces students to College- and Career- Readiness, college selection and transition, applying for financial aid, preparing for a career and internship, financial literacy, community service, and digital literacy and citizenship. In addition, students will develop a portfolio that uniquely demonstrates the culmination of their proficiency in academics and 21st Century Skills by allowing them to communicate their preparedness of 21st Century Skills and knowledge of post-secondary and career interests.

Career Technical Education Approved Courses 

Agriculture Career Program of Study

Introduction to Agriscience (029990)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

This course is designed to teach sciences related to modern Agricultural and natural resources technology. (This course is considered a lab-based science course for graduation in the state of Mississippi, but does not count as a science for entrance into an Institution of Higher Learning). This course may be taken by any student enrolled in grade 8, 9, or 10. 

Concepts of Agriscience (991000)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

This is a course to introduce students to the sciences, technologies, and applied practices of the progressive agriculture/agriscience industry. Emphasis is on an active learning environment enriched with technology and science-based applications. The course serves as the entry-level course for other courses in agriculture, including horticulture and forestry. The focus is to begin the preparation of students for further study leading to successful careers in the agricultural industry. This course may be taken by any student enrolled in grade 9 or 10. 

Agricultural Leadership and Personal Development (991701)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

Agricultural Leadership and Personal Development is a course to introduce students to the skills, attitudes, and habits that will enable them to be good leaders in both the agriculture industry and life. The program includes instruction in workplace skills, time management, and money management related to agricultural leadership and personal development. 

Agriculture & Natural Resources I (991100)

  • »2 semesters; 2 units credit

This course introduces students to the broad field of agriculture and natural resources. It includes instruction in the applied sciences related to plant and animal production and natural resource conservation and management.

Agriculture & Natural Resources II (991101)

  • 2 semesters; 2 units credit
  • Prerequisite: Agriculture & Natural Resources I

This course is a continuation of topics introduced in Agriculture & Natural Resources I on a higher level. Students will participate inactive learning exercises, including activities of the FFA organization.

Business Career Program of Study

Business Fundamentals I (110720) - ACADEMIC COURSE; (992301) - CTE COURSE

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit 

This course is the first half of the business fundamentals curriculum. Major topics of study in this course are communication and customer service, professional development for careers in business management, and economics.

Management Fundamental (110690) - ACADEMIC COURSE; (992304) - CTE COURSE

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

Management Fundamentals is an introduction to the field of business management and focuses on management’s role in attaining organizational goals. Topics include management functions, human resource development, and managing the various operational areas of a business. 

 

Management Essentials (110710) - ACADEMIC COURSE; (992306) - CTE COURSE

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

Management Essentials is a continuation of Management Fundamentals. Topics include the importance of managing information and the people who work with the information, how managers use analytical skills to make decisions that impact the economic health of the organization, and the skills needed to own and operate a successful business, which includes writing a business plan.

Marketing Essentials (110650) - ACADEMIC COURSE; (992401) - CTE COURSE

  • » year; 1 unit credit 

This course encompasses introductory marketing concepts such as pricing, promotion, and selling.

Sales and Distribution (110660) ACADEMIC COURSE; (992402) - CTE COURSE

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit 

Sales and Distribution is designed around providing students with advanced marking skills. Content includes distribution, marketing planning, product service management, international marketing, and various other marketing specializations.

Career Pathway Experience (CPE)

Career Pathway Experience (CPE) provides students with the opportunity to apply knowledge and skills learned in each pathway classroom towards an actual workspace. CPE courses foster self-directed learning; strengthen the development of core academic skills through application in authentic situations; allow students to explore career options; enhance communication skills, leadership, and problem solving, and contribute to community economic development. The goal of the Career Pathway Experience is to provide work-site learning for high school students who have a clearly defined career objective. Enrollment priority in the program is given to (1) students who have completed a 2-year Career & Technical Education (CTE) program; (2) students not enrolled in a CTE program but who have a clearly defined career objective as a junior; and (3) students who are enrolled in a CTE program if scheduling permits. The student must be employed in the area of his or her career training. The CPE program is a joint effort of the school, business and industry, and the community. 

Course Offerings

Hours / Carnegie units:

CPE Paid Work-Based Learning (WBL) (0.5, 1, or 2 credits of paid employment, maximum 15 hours per week). This option is a paid work-based learning opportunity for students. Students will turn in weekly documentation of time and earnings to the CPE instructor /coordinator.

  • 135 hours/year – 0.5 Carnegie Unit
  • 270 hours/year – 1 Carnegie Unit
  • 540 hours/year – 2 Carnegie Units

CPE Internship (Non-paid WBL) (0.5, 1, or 2 credits, maximum 15 hours per week) in a workplace setting (non-paid). This option is a non-paid work-based learning opportunity. The student will turn in timesheets to the CPE instructor/coordinator.

  • 135 hours/year – 0.5 Carnegie Unit
  • 270 hours/year – 1 Carnegie Unit
  • 540 hours/year – 2 Carnegie Units

CPE School-Based Internship (Non-paid WBL) (0.5 or 1 credit, maximum 15 hours per week). This option is only available for third-year students who have completed a program. The CTE instructor will be the employer. The student will turn in timesheets to the CPE instructor/coordinator.

  • 135 hours/year – 0.5 Carnegie Unit
  • 270 hours/year – 1 Carnegie Unit

CPE Apprenticeship (WBL) (1 or 2 credits, maximum 15 hours per week), strictly following the Department of Labor regulations.

  • 270 hours/year – 1 Carnegie Unit
  • 540 hours/year – 2 Carnegie Units

Culinary Arts Career Program of Study

Orientation to Culinary Arts (996002)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit 

This course includes a survey of the foundational skills necessary in the foodservice industry. Content such as food safety and sanitation, equipment, safety and security, culinary foundations and math, and an introduction to the hospitality industry are included in the course.

Theory & Application of Culinary Arts I (996004)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit 

This course emphasizes real-world, hands-on practice of food preparation. Food preparation techniques included in this course include breakfast foods, dairy, and sandwiches; fruits, vegetables, salads, and garnishes; and potatoes and grains.

Theory & Application of Culinary Arts II (996005)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit 

This course emphasizes real-world, hands-on practice of food preparation. Food preparation techniques included in this course include desserts and baked goods; meat, poultry, and seafood; and stocks, sauces, and soups.

Advanced Studies in Culinary Arts (996006)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit 

This course is a culminating course that places emphasis on an internship experience. While students participate in on-the-job training, they will use their skills related to management and business concepts, customer communication, and customer service.

Enrichment Courses 

Keystone (990002)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

This is an introduction to career pathways and career decision-making and includes content in self-development, career clusters, pathways, and choices, as well as financial planning.

Contemporary Health (340133 or 200140)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

This course helps students acquire the knowledge, attitudes, and skills necessary for making health-promoting decisions, achieving health literacy, adopting health-enhancing behaviors, and promoting the health of others. In this course of study, emphasis is placed on personal, social, and mental health in today’s society. It includes instruction on human growth and development, disease prevention and control, substance abuse and prevention, community and environmental health, nutrition and wellness, and safety and first aid. Students will be provided with instruction that is clearly relevant to today’s rapidly changing world.

Family Dynamics (200121)

  • 1 semester; ½ unit credit

This course develops skills related to personal, family, and social issues. It includes instruction in dimensions of adolescent development, family decisions and responsibilities, social decisions and responsibilities, and management of family systems in today’s society 

Nutrition and Wellness (200130)

  • 1 semester; ½ unit credit

This course develops skills related to proper nutrition and the concept of overall wellness. It includes instruction in nutrition, exercise and diet, healthy food choices, meal preparation, and components for a healthy lifestyle

Child Development (200122)

  • 1 semester; ½ unit credit

This course develops skills related to physical, social, intellectual, and emotional development of the child. It includes instruction on considerations for parenthood, prenatal care, child growth and development, behavior management, needs of exceptional children, and career opportunities

Resource Management (200129)

  • 1 semester; ½ unit credit

This course addresses the identification and management of personal resources and family finances to meet the needs and wants of individuals and families throughout the family life cycle, considering a broad range of economic, social, cultural, technological, environmental, and maintenance factors

Health Science Career Program of Study

Health Sciences I (995102)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit 

Year 1 -This course introduces students to the theory and practical applications of tasks related to employment in the field of health science. Students will cover topics such as safety in the workplace, infection control, and health care systems. The course offers insight into careers in health care as well as the educational requirements, and the professional, legal, and ethical responsibilities involved. 

Health Sciences II (995103)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit 

Year 2- This course continues to familiarize students with the theory and practical applications of the field of health science. Topics covered include the vital organs of the human body and health maintenance practices. Students will explore careers in health care as well as the educational requirements, and the professional, legal, and ethical responsibilities involved.

Healthcare and Clinical Services I (995104)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit 

Year 3- This course helps the student establish an understanding of specialty areas within the healthcare field. Students will be exposed to the theory and application related to careers within health care. This course covers topics such as emergency services, technical skills, and human growth and development. Also covered in this course are rehabilitative services, safety, and employability.

Healthcare and Clinical Services II (995105)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit 

Year 4- This course will allow students to investigate direct care as a career choice. Students will have the opportunity to discover information about pharmacological and diagnostic services and therapeutic services. This course covers medical and nursing services as well as information technology and health informatics. 

Sports Medicine: Theory and Application I (995202)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit 

Year 3- This course provides a foundation for careers in sports medicine fields. An emphasis is placed on students learning about healthcare administration, the athletic and sports medicine team, and medical emergencies as well as first aid, and CPR. The students will be introduced to sports equipment, protective gear, and bandaging, wrapping and taping techniques. Additional topics include therapeutic modalities, exercise in rehabilitation, and pharmacology in sports. 

Sports Medicine: Theory and Application II (995203)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit 

Year 4- This course helps the student investigate medical aspects of sports medicine as a career choice. It covers injuries that may occur from different types of sports including injuries to the head, spine, chest, abdomen, upper extremities, and lower extremities. This course also examines the skills necessary in emergency medical response.

Teacher Education Career Program of Study

Foundations of an Educator (996302)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit 

This course provides students with the opportunity to gain foundational skills needed to enhance them as learners, future educators, and communicators. Students receive history, theory, and professionalism needed to understand the educational system.

Practices of an Educator (996303)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit

This course provides students with the opportunity to gain knowledge and practice needed to enhance themselves as future educators. Students receive practice in communication skills, planning, teaching, and assessment strategies needed to understand the educational system

Exploring Diversity in Instruction (996304)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit 

This course provides students with the opportunity to gain knowledge and understand advanced information that must be instilled in educators. Students receive information pertaining to advanced communication skills, diverse learners, and various subject areas needed to work in the educational system.

Progressive Practices of Teacher Academy (996305)

  • 2 semesters; 1 unit credit 

This course provides students with the opportunity to gain knowledge and practice needed to enhance themselves as future educators. Students receive practice in communication skills, planning, teaching, and assessment strategies needed to understand the educational system.

Pearl-Rankin Career and Technical Center Course Descriptions

Career and technical education helps students fulfill their career and academic potential. At the Pearl/Rankin Career and Technical Center, students work toward workforce success in a variety of vocational programs of study, which require two years to complete. Students who successfully complete the two-year program earn 4 units toward graduation. They are prepared for entry-level employment in their occupational field and may continue in a post-secondary program, often with advanced placement. Career and Technical programs are available to 10th or 11th graders, with the exception of MECE which is only available to 11th or 12th graders. The center is located at the Hinds Community College-Rankin Campus. Transportation will be provided by the home school.

Note: Some programs may offer additional certifications not listed below. Please contact the career and technical center for additional information. All programs are Dual Credit.

College Planning

College / University Admissions Criteria
Scholarships
Tips for Applying for Scholarships


A diploma from a high school within Rankin County School District meets the entrance requirements for community colleges within the state of Mississippi. 

College / University Admissions Criteria

MS Institutions of Higher Learning (IHL)

All Mississippi Universities have the following admission requirements:

  1. Complete the College Prep Curriculum (CPC) with a minimum 3.20 high school grade point average (GPA) on the College Prep Curriculum;or
  2. Complete the College Prep Curriculum (CPC) with:
    1. a minimum 2.50 high school GPA on the CPC or a class rank in the top 50%, and
    2. a score of 16 or higher on the ACT* (Composite);

or

  1. Complete the College Prep Curriculum (CPC) with:
    1. a minimum 2.00 high school GPA on the College Prep Curriculum and
    2. a score of 18 or higher on the ACT* (Composite):

or

  1. Satisfy the NCAA standards for student athletes who are “full qualifiers” underDivision I guidelines.
    or
  2. Students who do not meet the above criteria are nonetheless eligible for admission. Such student must participate, however, in an on-campus placement process at the university of their choice. The process will determine whether the student may be enrolled in regular freshman-level courses or be required to enroll in the summer semester with mandatory participation in the Summer Developmental Program. Successful completion of the summer semester entitles the student to continued enrollment in the fall semester at the university of his or her choice. 

For more information on academic programs and admissions standards call 601-432-6501 or 

1-800-327-2980. For financial aid information call 601-432-6663. The Institutions of Higher Learning website can be visited at http://www.ihl.state.ms.us/.

*In lieu of ACT scores, students may submit equivalent SAT scores. Students entering Community Colleges with ACT scores below 18 in English, 22 in math, 21 in reading, and 24 in science may be required to take remedial non-credit courses. These benchmark scores indicate a 50% chance of making a high B or a 75% chance of making a high C in college coursework.

* Athletes – The NCAA requires that ACT scores be sent directly to the NCAA. They no longer accept ACT scores recorded on a student transcript.

Scholarships

Scholarships vary in amount and are awarded on the basis of achievement, talent, and personal qualities. Scholarships are gifts and do not have to be repaid. The strength of the curriculum, a student’s grade point average, SAT/ACT scores, extracurricular activities, community service, and individual financial need determine the majority of scholarship winners.

The top four categories for scholarship opportunities include:

  1. Academic ScholarshipsBased on student’s cumulative grade-point average for grades 9-12 and college entrance exam scores
  2. Talent An audition, performance competition, or portfolio may be required. Talent is based on student’s participation in art, music, and drama.
  3. Athletic Based on student’s athletic ability and coaches’ recommendations
  4. Miscellaneous Includes memorial scholarships, trust funds, community organizations, professional organizations, employers, and union scholarships

Tips for Applying for Scholarships

  • Research individual college scholarship programs by checking websites for scholarship offers and financial aid opportunities.
  • Speak to your high school counselor about the availability of scholarships.
  • Explore a variety of scholarship possibilities via church, work, community, and various school activities.

Internet Resources

www.get2college.org - advice and strategies for financial aid for college (800-986-4322, located on Lakeland Drive in Jackson, MS)

www.collegeboard.org - information about colleges and college placement entrance exams

www.fastweb.com - find scholarship money for college; get expert tips on careers and financial aid

www.mississippi.edu/riseupms - comprehensive information about post-secondary education in Mississippi

www.mappingyourfuture.org –assistance in making decisions about careers and post-secondary educational opportunities

ACT Results and Grades Determine Scholarship Opportunities

*** This list is not inclusive of all the post-secondary institutions in Mississippi. ***

ACT Score

Scholarship Opportunity (based on ACT Score and gpa)

15

MTAG (Mississippi Resident Tuition Assistance Grant) $500 for freshman/sophomore year and

$1000 for junior/senior year if high school GPA is 2.5+; MS resident for 

20

HELP Scholarship (Higher Education Legislative Plan) Tuition and required fees for no more than 8 semesters at a public institution (Family Adjusted Gross Income considered. See website for details https://www.msfinancialaid.org/help/

29

MESG (Mississippi Eminent Scholars Grant) $2500 per year, (GPA of 3.5; MS resident for 1 year)

Important Scholarships Links

Alcorn University http://www.alcorn.edu/giving-back/scholarships/index.aspx

Belhaven University http://www.belhaven.edu/admission/scholarships.htm

 

Delta State University http://www.deltastate.edu/school-of-nursing/scholarship-opportunities/

East MS Community College http://www.eastms.edu/students/student-services/financial-aid-2/Pages/EMCC-scholarships.aspx

Hinds Community College http://www.hindscc.edu/admissions/scholarships/#gsc.tab=0

Holmes Community College https://www.holmescc.edu/financial_aid/grants_scholarships/holmesscholly.aspx

Jackson State University http://www.jsums.edu/financialaid/scholarships/

Mississippi College http://www.mc.edu/offices/financial-aid/scholarships

Mississippi State University http://www.admissions.msstate.edu/freshmen/money-matters/

Mississippi University for Women http://www.muw.edu/admissions/affordable/scholarships

Millsaps College http://www.millsaps.edu/administrative_offices/financial_aid_types_of_assistance.php

Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College http://www.mgccc.edu/financial-aid/scholarships/

 

University of Southern Mississippi http://www.usm.edu/admissions/freshman-scholarships

University of Mississippi http://finaid.olemiss.edu/scholarships/

Tougaloo College https://www.tougaloo.edu/admissions/office-student-financial-aid/scholarships

William Carey University https://www.wmcarey.edu/scholarshipsv

Academic Common Market:

Students selecting an academic major that is not offered in Mississippi may be able to attend college in another southern public college or university without paying out of state tuition. For information, visit http://www.sreb.org.